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Home Inspection Guide

What a Home Inspection Should Cover The type of property you are purchasing will generally determine your home inspection. A small condominium will require less specialized inspection compared to a large historic home. You can get a home inspection guide to know what a home inspector will check though. Every guide should contain the following list which can be used by you in evaluating any property you might want to purchase. You can also try the virtual home inspection at the American Society of Home Inspectors’ website at www.ASHI.org.  Structure: the structural components which include the framing and foundation impacts how the property stands up to the earth, gravity and the weather, and as such should be inspected. Exterior: everything that makes up the exterior including balconies, decks, attached porches, sidewalks and driveways, surface drainage, trim, brick, wood, vinyl, stucco, doors and windows etc should be looked at during the home inspection by the inspector. Roofing: protecting you from snow, rain and other forces of nature is the function of a well-maintained roof hence the roof’s drainage systems, conditions of flashing, and age should be noted. Also to be noted are the chimneys, skylight, downspouts, loose gutters and buckled shingles. Plumbing: to be inspected under this category includes sump and drainage pumps, fuel storage systems, water heating equipment, and water supply systems. Corrosion, rust spots, banging pipes, poor water pressure could be problem indicators. Electrical: It is essential to have safe wiring hence you should check for disconnects, breakers and fuses, service panels, the number of outlets in the room, and the condition of service entrance wires. Heating: under this category you look at the chimneys, flues, vent systems, and heating system. You find out if the water heater’s size is adequate for the house, check its energy rating, and speed of recovery, and of course, its age. Air Conditioning: your cooling system and its energy source should be inspected together with the through-wall and central cooling equipment considering both its energy rating and age. Interiors: properly inspecting the garage door system and garage door, cabinets, countertops, railings, stairways, steps, floors, ceilings and walls and other interiors can reveal construction defects, rot, insect damage, plumbing leaks and other issues. Ventilation/insulation: it is important to check adequate ventilation and insulation in the crawlspaces and attic and for secured insulation in walls to prevent energy loss. All insulations should be suited for the climate as water damage and mold can result from excess moisture in the home. Fireplaces: this system should be well-examined by inspectors since they can be dangerous if not properly installed, though they are charming. The flue and vent and fuel burning appliances should be noted too. What’s Not Inspected A home inspection usually doesn’t cover the following areas though there might be variations of what is covered. A certified specialist should be contacted if you suspect problems in the following areas: toxic mold, lead paint, radon gas, asbestos, swimming pool, and pest control. Your home inspection guide should be able to lists these also. i
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© 2010 Home Buyer
Home Finance

Home Inspection Guide

What a Home Inspection Should Cover The type of property you are purchasing will generally determine your home inspection. A small condominium will require less specialized inspection compared to a large historic home. You can get a home inspection guide to know what a home inspector will check though. Every guide should contain the following list which can be used by you in evaluating any property you might want to purchase. You can also try the virtual home inspection at the American Society of Home Inspectors’ website at www.ASHI.org.  Structure: the structural components which include the framing and foundation impacts how the property stands up to the earth, gravity and the weather, and as such should be inspected. Exterior: everything that makes up the exterior including balconies, decks, attached porches, sidewalks and driveways, surface drainage, trim, brick, wood, vinyl, stucco, doors and windows etc should be looked at during the home inspection by the inspector. Roofing: protecting you from snow, rain and other forces of nature is the function of a well-maintained roof hence the roof’s drainage systems, conditions of flashing, and age should be noted. Also to be noted are the chimneys, skylight, downspouts, loose gutters and buckled shingles. Plumbing: to be inspected under this category includes sump and drainage pumps, fuel storage systems, water heating equipment, and water supply systems. Corrosion, rust spots, banging pipes, poor water pressure could be problem indicators. Electrical: It is essential to have safe wiring hence you should check for disconnects, breakers and fuses, service panels, the number of outlets in the room, and the condition of service entrance wires. Heating: under this category you look at the chimneys, flues, vent systems, and heating system. You find out if the water heater’s size is adequate for the house, check its energy rating, and speed of recovery, and of course, its age. Air Conditioning: your cooling system and its energy source should be inspected together with the through-wall and central cooling equipment considering both its energy rating and age. Interiors: properly inspecting the garage door system and garage door, cabinets, countertops, railings, stairways, steps, floors, ceilings and walls and other interiors can reveal construction defects, rot, insect damage, plumbing leaks and other issues. Ventilation/insulation: it is important to check adequate ventilation and insulation in the crawlspaces and attic and for secured insulation in walls to prevent energy loss. All insulations should be suited for the climate as water damage and mold can result from excess moisture in the home. Fireplaces: this system should be well-examined by inspectors since they can be dangerous if not properly installed, though they are charming. The flue and vent and fuel burning appliances should be noted too. What’s Not Inspected A home inspection usually doesn’t cover the following areas though there might be variations of what is covered. A certified specialist should be contacted if you suspect problems in the following areas: toxic mold, lead paint, radon gas, asbestos, swimming pool, and pest control. Your home inspection guide should be able to lists these also.
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